The Mental Anguish of Being an SEO Vendor

27 Aug
2012

The Mental Anguish of Being an SEO Vendor

This is a topic I have’t seen much so I thought I’d add my $.02.

Many times you are hired on as the person or company that will help an organization rank for terms that are important to them. As part of this process, as the SEO vendor, you start to learn about the company, the business and the industry segment that they are a part of.

Unless you’ve already worked in that particular industry already, there will be some new information to learn. All of this is just part of what begins the mental stress of working for a client brings.

Not only do you have to worry about getting the client site ranked, you must now also be worried about other factors that can impact their business. Some things are just beyond your control, but since you are the “hired gun”, you are the one let go when things go awry.

I just had a client that despite four #1 rankings in Google for their critical terms, went out of business. They were getting the targeted traffic they wanted, but their sales people just couldn’t convert all those new prospects into clients.

That’s the first time I’ve experienced that dilemma, but it’s a great reminder that top rankings don’t equal success. Sales is the only metric that matters. Everything else is just said to make people look good to their bosses. Who cares if you have 100k followers if none of them buy anything you sell? Likes don’t pay the bills, CONVERSIONS do.

Anyways, back to point.

The role of the SEO vendor is to help to strategically create a plan that can be executed. When the client wins, we continue to get paid. If the client fails, it’s game over of the SEO vendor.

Many times there might be some strife with IT or others within the organization. Another stress point to deal with. Sometimes the market just gets clobbered (Real Estate), or the client just doesn’t have the will power to continue.

As you can see, there are many items that the SEO vendor worries about when they are brought on board. Remember that they are getting paid to care – don’t forget to use that to your advantage.

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Paul
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Get his thoughts at his blog (www.ranksurge.com) or follow him on Twitter (@semconsulting) G+ (https://plus.google.com/+PaulBliss3)

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